100 Bookstagram Post Prompts To Engage Your Followers

100 Bookstagram Post Prompts To Engage Your Followers

Bookish people tend to find other likeminded bookish people. There are a few places on the internet where whole communities of story-loving booknerds can be found, one of which is Instagram. Instagram is one of the most popular image-sharing social media platforms in the world, with an estimated 1 billion active users monthly worldwide. The bookish community there is affectionately referred to as Bookstagram (cute, right?).

If you have a Bookstagram account, then you’ve probably wondered how to grow your following and reach other bookish users.

Personally, I use Bookstagram to connect with potential readers for the Young Adult High Fantasy novel, The Sapeiro Chronicles: A Forgotten Past. But I also use it to meet other authors in my genre, and have had the incredible opportunity to chat with readers and writers world-wide.

I’m not going to lie and try to pretend to understand the intricacies of how the platform’s analytics work to push content to those who are likely to enjoy it. However, one thing is certain: Instagram–and by extension, most social media platforms, value and reward engagement. The more people who engage with your content, either through liking or commenting on your posts, the more likely that your content will continue to be pushed and promoted, furthering your reach.

As content creators, it’s incredibly important to maintain an active presence on social media. However, this can be daunting and time consuming. Not to mention that sometimes, your creativity well runs dry.

What I’ve found to be helpful in driving engagement is to ask people an interesting question of the day (QOTD) to try and get your followers to interact with your post.

So here’s a list of topics/questions to ask your followers and maintain engagement!

Let’s start with the basics:

  1. What’s your favorite book?
  2. Who is your favorite author?
  3. What’s your favorite genre?
  4. What’s your favorite series?
  5. What’s your favorite standalone?
  6. What’s your favorite duology?
  7. What’s your favorite trilogy?
  8. What’s the last book you added to your TBR?
  9. What’s the last book your judged by its cover?
  10. What’s your most anticipated book for 2022?
  11. What are you currently reading?
  12. What was your last five-star read?
  13. Do you ever re-read books?
  14. Without including spoilers, what book had the biggest twist you never saw coming?
  15. Do you prefer hardcovers or paperbacks?
  16. What book made you fall in love with reading?
  17. What’s the last book you DNF?
  18. Do you multitask while reading?
  19. How do you organize your bookshelf?
  20. Do you have a reading buddy?
  21. Describe your favorite book badly!

Get to know your audience:

  1. What’s a book you wish you could read for the first time again?
  2. What’s a book you couldn’t put down?
  3. What’s the last book that made you cry?
  4. What’s your favorite book trope?
  5. What’s your favorite classic story?
  6. What’s your favorite myth?
  7. What’s your favorite retelling?
  8. Would you buy a book you already owned because it had a cover you preferred?
  9. What’s the prettiest book you own?
  10. What book have you read the most?
  11. If you could read only one genre for the rest of your life, what would it be?
  12. What’s the quickest it’s taken you to read a book?
  13. How many books do you pack when going on vacation?
  14. What book did Bookstagram make you buy?
  15. What is a book that didn’t live up to the hype?
  16. What’s your favorite spin-off?
  17. Best translated books you’ve ever read?
  18. What book broke you?
  19. What book gave you secondhand cringe?
  20. Do you read indie books?
  21. Which book did you wish had a sequel?
  22. What sequel do you think was better than the original?
  23. Do you keep the dust jacket on when you read?
  24. Which series do you think is going to be the next mainstream series?
  25. What’s an underrated book that you think everyone should read?
  26. What’s a popular book that doesn’t deserve the hype?
  27. What’s your Hogwarts house?
  28. You inherit a character’s power! What is it?
  29. What’s a book that you’re scared to read?
  30. Have you ever reviewed a book before?
  31. Has a book ever made you mad before?
  32. What’s the longest series you’ve read?
  33. What’s the longest book you’re read?
  34. What do you think makes a good story?
  35. What’s a book pet peeve that you have?
  36. What book did you find underwhelming?

This or that questions:

  1. Do you prefer drinking tea or coffee?
  2. Do you listen to music when you read?
  3. Do you prefer reading inside, or outside?
  4. Do you prefer fiction or non-fiction?
  5. Do you prefer standalones or series?
  6. Do you prefer first-person POV or third-person?
  7. Do you prefer clean romance or some spice?
  8. Which trope do you prefer: Enemies to lovers or slow burn?
  9. Simple covers, or elaborate ones?
  10. Do you prefer reading in the morning, or at night?
  11. Pirates or sirens?
  12. Assassins or warriors?
  13. Would you rather read from the hero’s POV, or the villain’s?
  14. Physical books or eBooks?
  15. Disney or Pixar?
  16. Fiction or non-fiction?
  17. If you could pick a companion animal, what would it be?

Character-related questions

  1. Who is your favorite book couple?
  2. Who is your favorite book girlfriend/boyfriend?
  3. Who is your least favorite villain?
  4. Who is your favorite villain?
  5. What’s your favorite monster?
  6. If you could become part of any fictional world, which one would it be?

General questions:

  1. What’s your favorite season?
  2. What could you talk about for an hour without any hesitation or preparation?
  3. What are you most grateful for?
  4. What’s a quote that you live by?
  5. What are your reading goals?
  6. What are your weekend plans?
  7. Do you read multiple books at once?
  8. How do you keep track of your reading?
  9. Do you annotate books?
  10. What’s your favorite snack?
  11. What did you want to be when you grew up?
  12. Are you a morning person, or a night owl?
  13. What’s your creative outlet?
  14. If you could study anything in the world, what would it be?
  15. Where do you go for book recommendations?
  16. Do you have a book blog?
  17. How many languages can you read in?
  18. Are you subscribed to any bookish boxes?
  19. What’s the most underwhelming talent you have?
  20. What’s an underrated book you wished got more attention?

Time-related questions

  1. How many books do you buy a month?
  2. Monthly round-up! How many books did you read this month?
  3. What’s your reading goal for this month?
  4. What’s your reading goal this year?

Here are a few examples of engaging posts I’ve made on my Instagram page:

HOW TO MAKE AN AUTHOR’S DAY

As the air outside gets colder, and windows begin to glisten with an effervescent sheen of frost on them in the morning, it can only mean one thing.

I will start wearing gloves and a hat to type, because it’s cold as **** outside. Also, winter is coming, and all the darkness with it. The bright side is the pretty lights, the Christmas tree, and general Holiday cheer in the air. Even with the… circumstances…that we are living through in 2020, there is still reason to celebrate and be merry, even if it’s from six feet apart.

On to the good stuff. You may have come in possession of an author recently. Maybe it’s a friend, a partner, a child, or a colleague. And you may be wondering how to make their day. Luckily, you’ve come to the right place! Authors aren’t really that complicated. All they need is a bit of love, some caffeinated warm drink, and long stretches of silence. But there are absolutely ways to help them as they fledge into their final author form and grow as writers. Here are a few easy, simple and cheap ideas on how to make an author’s day.

Buy their book

This point may seem terribly obvious, but buying an author’s book is a great way to encourage them to continue writing and working on their passion projects. It’s also a way to achieve rankings on Amazon and other book-seller websites.

Authors spend hundreds, if not thousands of hours poring over their work, trying to catch every mistake, plot hole, and under-developed character before the book is printed. It has been re-read so many times by the writer that the words melt into one another and the story stops making sense.

So every copy sold, even if it’s bought by a friend or family member, brings a small ray of sunshine into the little author’s heart. And each copy sold brings with it the hope that more copies will be sold through word of mouth, until eventually complete strangers begin picking up copies of the book!

So, buy the book. It is the easiest way to support your author friend. Even if it isn’t a genre that you read, even if it will sit on your bookshelf for years. Buy the book. Don’t ask for a free copy. It invalidates the blood, sweat, tears and literal thousands of dollars the author may have poured into bringing the book to market.

Buy the book.

Buy the book for your friends

Good, so you bought yourself a copy. Now, consider buying it for your friends. Did the author in your life just publish an illustrated kid’s book? Buy it for the end-of-year raffle at your child’s day care.

Or better yet, get all your holiday shopping done at once and buy copies for all the children in your life, get them signed, and then be the cool person who brought signed books for all the kids. It’s a good look, trust me.

Buying copies for others is a great way to spread the author’s work and maybe inspire others to check their work. Your author friend will be grateful for the exposure, and for the thoughtful gesture! Not to mention, it might be the fastest holiday shopping you ever do.

Review the book

Authors have a fickle relationship with reviews. On the one hand, a good review can inspire another potential fan to pick up a copy and give the book a shot. On the other, a needlessly cruel review can drive potential buyers away and result in lost sales. But the worst is having no reviews.

Obtaining reviews is hard. Like, harder than writing the book. It’s the literary equivalent of pulling teeth.

Think of it, how many times have you reviewed a product? Yet how much do you rely on reviews when buying things?

There’s a reason authors are obnoxiously annoying about getting people to review their books. And it’s because every review counts. Every little star is worth its weight in gold, and helps bring the book one step closer to finding its way to another potential fan.

This is especially true for Amazon reviews. Amazon works with complex algorithms that are akin to magic. But they do bring people towards products they are likely interested in. Blame it on Big Brother, but the algorithms work wonders in making sure your target audience is targeted.

Thing is, these algorithms only work if the reviews are in. No one really knows what the ‘magic’ number is, what number brings you closer to having your book in a newsletter. But the general consensus is that reviews are good, and a product that has many good reviews has a higher likelihood of being recommended to audiences interested in the product.

So yeah, buy the book, and then review the book.

Talk about the book

So you’ve read the book, reviewed the book, and bought copies for your friends. What’s next? Now it’s time to talk about the book. Have you ever suddenly become interested in a movie or show because someone spoke about it? Same happens with books.

Sales and exposure are the two things that authors crave. And they work hand in hand. Have good exposure? You’ll probably have decent sales. Have good sales? It’s probably going to lead to more exposure. The effect is exponential. The more people are exposed to a product, the more likely they are to think it is good, and the more likely they are to give it a chance.

So go ahead. Share that book picture on Instagram! Recommend the book in a thread asking for good entertainment. A lot of times, authors take care of their own marketing, and it can be really, really heartbreaking when it doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. So hyping up a book on social media is really the best way to help support your author friend.

And it doesn’t just need to be once! The effect is compounded: the more people who do it, and the more often, the higher the chances someone will stumble upon the book and like what they see.

So you see? Supporting your author friend isn’t complicated, and nor is it expensive! But each of these little things brings a lot of recognition and exposure to the author and will help them as they grow their audiences and flourish as a writer.

Interested in supporting an indie author? You can do so by buying my book The Sapeiro Chronicles: A Forgotten Past here! And don’t forget to review it once you’re done reading!